Tag Archives: Biblical Studies

Paul’s Graeco-Roman Context

9789042932715-1In recent decades, the figure of the Apostle Paul has gained the attention of scholars and researchers. New studies on personal issues as well as his ministry als the Apostle to the Gentile are being released almost every day.

Paul was a first century Jewish who held the Roman citizenship. The time and place he lived requires studying Paul within his cultural and political context. The book Paul’s Greco-Roman Context, (Peeters Publishers, 2015), by Cilliers Breytenbach (general editor) is, perhaps, one of the most complete resources for the study of the Apostle Paul’s context.

This volume is a collection of essays written by different and respectable scholars from different countries, predominantly from Europe and the USA. It contains thirty-four essays written in French (4), German (10), and English (20), in 751 pages. Those readers who can read these three languages could benefit from reading the thirty-four essays (this review is only focused on the essays written in English as this reviewer cannot read French or German languages). This book is the volume #277 of the reputable series Bibliotheca Ephemeridum Theologicarum Lovaniensium published by the aforementioned publishing house.

The topics addressed by the authors are varied, having in common the figure of the Apostle Paul. Paul and Popular Philosophy, Paul and Ancient Civic Ethics, Elements of the Graeco-Roman Context in the Christian Community of Philippi, are some of the themes readers will find in this thorough volume. Essays are twenty pages long (average) and transmit the sensation of reading the writings of serious scholars who have the ability to condense all their knowledge in twenty pages without leaving readers uninformed. Every essay will make readers feel as if they have read a hole book.

Reading a book written by different authors has many advantages, though some people see some disadvantages as well. One of the advantages of reading a multi-author book is that readers can get different point of views from different cultural backgrounds concerning a given topic (in this case, Paul and his context). In this volume, this factor is an element that contributes to make this book a must have resource for scholars, Bible students, pastors, and anyone interested in learning more about Paul as a prominent figure in the Bible.

If you live in Europe, you can buy this book directly from the publisher here.

For those living in the USA, you can buy this book from Amazon

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

Eschatology: Biblical, Historical, and Practical Approaches

51qI7WsVXFL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Eschatology is one of the most debated themes among evangelicals. The expectation of the last things has always called the attention of scholars. Eschatology is interpreted depending on the school of interpretation one holds. One of the most prominent seminaries on the topic of eschatology is Dallas Theological Seminary, a reputable seminary where dispensationalism is still the predominant point of view regarding eschatology. Many books on the topic of the last things have been written by professors from DTS. That is the case of the book that is being reviewed here.

Eschatology: Biblical, Historical, and Practical Approaches (D. Jeffrey Bingham & Glenn R. Kreider, ed., 2016) is a compilation of twenty-eight essays written by different authors and published by Kregel Academic. Contributors are well known scholars among evangelicals. Charles C. Ryrie, Stanley Toussaint, David L. Turner are some of the contributors readers will find inside this fine volume.

 Many people do not like books written from different authors arguing it is difficult to find a single idea or point of view. That is true to some extent. However, reading a book written by different authors developing the same idea is extremely profitable and has many advantages. One of the advantages this multiple-authors book encloses is precisely the different lenses available for readers to look at the same topic, though most of the authors subscribe to the dispensational school. That is not a handicap at all as this book will reinforce anyone’s knowledge regarding eschatology despite the school of interpretations one holds.

This work is divided into four main parts. Part 1 is devoted to The Doctrine of the Future and Its Foundations; Part 2 deals with The Doctrine of the Future in the Bible; Part 3 focuses on The Doctrine of the Future in the History of Christian Thought; and last but not least Part 4 presents The Doctrine of the Future and Christian Ministry. Eschatological discussions and topics included in this book are various.

Pastors, Bible students, and Christian in general could benefit from this book as a great source of information regarding the doctrine of the last things. One may agree or disagree with the points presented by the authors, but that does not detract quality to the book. I highly recommend this book to anyone seeking to reinforce or even lay the foundations for the study of the topic of eschatology.

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Studies in Paul’s Letter to the Philippians, by Hans Dieter Betz

descargaSeries: Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen Zum Neuen Testament (Book 343)

Hardcover: 200 pages

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck (February 1, 2015)

Price: $80.39 or 89.00 €

The figure of the Apostle Paul, as well as his writings, has been historically subject to detailed scrutiny and criticism. New researches and studies are being periodically published, with the Apostle to the Gentile as the matter of study. Sometimes, these studies or essays are put together as a book. That is the case of the book Studies in Paul’s Letter to the Philippians, by Hans Dieter Betz, (Mohr Siebek, 2015).

This book is a collection of essays mainly dedicated to the study of the Apostle Paul and his letter to the Philippians. In his introduction, Betz clarifies the purpose of this book and how this volume differs from biblical commentaries in purpose, nature, and content. He states, “Generally, the difference is that while a commentary’s task is to explain a given document in its entirety, ‘studies’ present further investigations regarding specific passages or problems yet unresolved or even undiscovered” (p. 1). This statement sets the nature and objective of this work, and it is crucial readers are aware of that difference.

The book contains seven essays forming the seven chapters this book offers:

  1. Introduction
  2. A Statement of Principle (Phil 1:21–26)
  3. An Autobiographical Memorandum (Phil 3:1b–21)
  4. On Being a Paulinist (Phil 4:8–9)
  5. On Self-Sufficiency (Phil 4:10–13)
  6. The Cost of Missions: A Look at Paul’s Finances (Phil 4:10–20)
  7. On the Question of the Literary Genre

The author begins by addressing issues pertaining to textual criticism, literary criticism, and the complexities resulting from not having access, for obvious reasons, to the original manuscripts. The author emphasizes the origin and nature of the Biblical text we have today and the variants that have resulted in different versions. Betz’s main point concerning this issue is that the Biblical text we got is a copy of copies, and that to some extent we must be cognizant of the textual challenges we can find in doing exegesis.

The rest of the book is devoted to the study of some passages that present critical challenges for both readers and scholars. Betz disseminates Biblical passages under discussion in a remarkable way. He writes in a skillful way making use of the Greek language when necessary. Readers must be aware of that; a basic knowledge of classic Greek is required in order to be able to read this book; at least ability to read in Greek.

How can this book serve us in our ministries? As it was mentioned before, this book is not a commentary on the whole letter to the Philippians. However, it can be used as a primary resource for pastors who are planning on preaching or conducting a series of biblical studies on Philippians, as this book offers deeper perspectives on selected passages. This is a book any pastor should have in consort with commentaries on the letter to the Philippians. This is a very informative volume that serves Bible students for the purpose of gaining new perspectives on some passages from the letter to the Philippians. It contains insightful points Biblical commentaries do not offer dues to the own nature and purpose of the book.

I anticipate this book is going to remain for years as an outstanding work on Pauline studies.

You can buy the book here from the publisher, for those living in Europe, or at Amazon for those living in the USA.

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

A Commentary on The Psalms, Volume 3, (90-150)

9780825426667 (1)Every time we open our Bibles with the intention of studying the word of God in a methodical and responsible way, we are always challenged by the passage we have in front of us. Date, authorship, historical context, theology, and literary issues should always be considered by Bible students. The book of Psalms is one of those books that present extra challenges to readers. Why? Well, the writings this book contains were written by different authors, who lived in different epochs of the history of Israel, and under different circumstances and occasions. For that reason, students need to consider the author and the context for every Psalm individually, as if they were isolated from each other.

These challenges force students and pastors to obtain top level commentaries, as the one we are reviewing here. A Commentary on the Psalms, (Allen P. Ross, PhD), Volume 3, is the one that closes the superb work on the book of Psalms made by the aforementioned author. The three volumes are part of the very well know and valued Kregel Exegetical Library. This volume comprises chapters 90 through 150. In it, Ross continues his thorough work, preceded by volumes 1 and 2, where he disseminates every Psalms verse by verse. He divides his study into two main sections, which are Introduction and Commentary in Expository Form. He also includes a Message and Application section at the end of every chapter.

Introductions include Text and Textual Variants, Composition and Context, and Exegetical Analysis. The commentary sections are presented in an outlined method, which make this commentary an invaluable resource for pastor preaching or teaching on the book of Psalms. Dr. Ross’ commentary offers generous explanations and solid commentaries.

Message and Application sections are an invaluable tool that helps the reader to make personal applications of the book of Psalms for us today. These applicatory sections are similar in nature to the conclusion and application of an expository sermon. In fact, the whole commentary has the same structure as expository sermons have. Another reason I recommend this book to every pastor, minister, and Bible students in general.

Readers who are not familiar with Hebrew language may feel intimidated by Ross’ commentary, but this is only before you really start reading the book. The author does not exaggerate the usage of Hebrew terms, so readers who are not familiar with this biblical language can read the commentary without fearing not understanding it. Ross strategically includes Hebrew terminology when he thinks it is appropriate and necessary, and he does so brilliantly.

This master piece composed by three generous volumes (2736 pages in total) would be an incredible addition to any pastoral or church library. I anticipate this work will be a point of reference and an outstanding work for many decades. I cannot think of any other recent commentary on the book of Psalms that can even compete with Ross’ work in terms of quality and price-value. Highly recommendable.

Buy this volume here or the three-volume set here 

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

 

Spreading the Feast: Instructions and Meditations for Ministry at the Lord’s Table

prpbooks-images-covers-md-9781629951768It is alarming when a pastor or a minister in a given congregation only refers to 1 Corinthians 11 with the occasion of the Lord Supper. Of course this is not the only passage that clearly talks about this ordinance. When that happens, we can only think this minister is not familiar with the biblical and theological foundations of the Lord’s Supper. There are many books on Theology, many exegetical commentaries on the different books of the Bible, but there are few books in the Christian market that are devoted exclusively to the ordinance of Lord’s Supper.

Spreading the Feast (Howard Griffith, 2015, published by P&R Publishing) is a book that will change or affirm readers’ perspectives about the Lord’s Supper and does this ceremony really implies. The book is divided into two sections. Part one: Foundations (pages 25−73) is divided into three chapters. Chapter one (Theology) contains the theological foundation of the Lord’s Supper. The author goes from to the gospels to Paul’s writings, exploring also the meaning of the term covenant as it is related to the Lord’s Supper. Griffith provides a relatively brief but profound and effective theological perspective of the Lord’s Supper.

Chapter two (Inviting) is an exhaustive study on who is entitled to participate of the Lord’s Supper, based on the biblical point of view. Griffith develops the idea of including all believers who have been baptized according to the Lord’s ordinance, not matter if they belong to our local church or not. This chapter also provides three examples of invitation to the Lord’s Supper. The author closes chapter two with a warning section. Griffith refers to the warnings Paul addressed to the Corinthians in participating the Lord’s Supper.

Chapter three (Basic Themes) is devoted to the explanation of basic concepts and their meanings about the Lord’s Supper; what it means and what it does not mean.

Part two: Mediations (pages 77−144) is more personal and introspective. It contains meditations on passages that point to the Lord’s Supper. This part is divided into three sections: (1) Old Covenant Anticipations; (2) New Covenant Fulfillment; (3) The Riches of Union With Christ. This section is of great help for ministers as the author walks through the Scriptures reflecting and meditating on passages that support the importance of the Lord’s Supper.

Summarizing, Griffith has made a remarkable job in writing from his own experience as a pastor and theologian regarding the Lord’s Supper. I anticipate this book is going to be a point of reference for ministers today and in subsequent decades. This book has helped me to gain more awareness of the Lord’s Supper and its implications. It has impacted me not only as a pastor but also as a Christian for whom the blood of Christ was spilled.

I recommend this book, first to pastors and ministers who are in charge of ministering at the Lord’s Table. Secondly, I recommend this book to seminary students who are pursuing pastoral studies. Finally, I recommend this book to every Christian seeking to have a broader awareness of what does it mean participating of the Lord’s Supper.

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

BibleWorks 10 part IV

I remember when I studied New Testament Greek in college and how useful the flashcards were for students. I still have the picture in my mind of classmates reading the Basics of Biblical Greek Vocabulary Cards, by Williams D. Mounce, in the corridors before quizzes and exams. Flashcards are useful, but they miss a very important element: pronunciation. BibleWorks 10 solves this problem with the Vocabulary Flashcard Module this software provides. I wish I had BibleWorks when I went to college.

The Vocabulary Flashcard Module is easy to access and very easy to use. The tab is located on the top of the screen. When users open the Vocabulary Flashcard Module, there is a small and expandable window that will pop up. The words this module contains are sort by frequency, which means that the most repeated words in the New Testament are on the top of the list. You may prefer sorting the words by alphabetical order, which can be easily done. Frequency is still shown together with the word.

Once in the Vocabulary Flashcard Module, you may want to use the arrows to move from one word to the next one. The first time you click the arrow you will listen to the pronunciation. The second click shows the definition for that word. But, how this module can help you as a student of Greek? Well, the Vocabulary Flashcard Module contains a box with a check mark and second box with an X symbol. The check mark is for users to mark those words that have already been learned. The X symbol is for unlearned words or those words you failed. This feature can save you time, money, and some space in your office. Also, you do not need to deal with lost or damaged cards. But above all, you will be able to learn pronunciation. You can even record your pronunciation and save it as a file.

If you are a current or future student of New Testament Greek and you want to take a step forward in you learning process, then you need this software.

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More reviews of BibleWorks 10: Part IPart IIPart III

I received this software for free from the editors in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Time in the Book of Ecclesiastes

9780198739708Bundvad, M., Time in the Book of Ecclesiastes. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. 

The book of Ecclesiastes is one of those books that present many challenges to students, researches, professors, and pastors. Authorship and date of composition are still subject of discussion among scholars. The book “Time in the Book of Ecclesiastes” offers a noteworthy approach to the concept of time in the book of Ecclesiastes.

In this book Bundvad does a very thorough research of the concept of time in the book of Ecclesiastes. She begins by providing insights regarding the composition and structure of the book. She approaches to the book of Ecclesiastes as a single-author work that latter received few additions to the main body of the book. Bundvad argues in favor of an intertestamental period for the composition of the book. She suggests the third century BCE as the most plausible date of writing. That eliminates Salomon as the author of the book.

The author appeals to linguistic and theological-philosophical arguments to affirm a late date of composition of the book of Ecclesiastes.  She sees similarities between the wisdom reflected by the author of Ecclesiastes and Greek philosophers, though she does not adopt a specific position among early or posterior Greek philosophers.  Bundvad considers this way of dating the book of Ecclesiastes as the most accepted point of view among today scholars and states that only few scholars argue against that date of composition.

In chapter 2 Bundvad presents an overview about the concept of time in the Hebrew Bible. Once again, she appeals to linguistic arguments as a necessary component to the study of the concept of time in the Hebrew Bible.

It is in chapter 3 where Bundvad begins the study of the concept of time in itself. She uses the poems placed at the beginning and the end of the book of Ecclesiastes (1:4−11 and 12:1−7) as two point of reference for the study of the concept of time in the book of Ecclesiastes. She provides a cosmological and human perspective of the concept of time and how these two perspectives relate to each other and interact through the book of Ecclesiastes.

Chapter 4 is devoted to the study of the present from a human perspective and how we assimilate and understand our condition in the time we live; our own experience and what we learn through our lives. Bundvad’s conclusion in chapter 4 is that Qohelet (the term she uses to refer to the author of Ecclesiastes) is not interested in providing a final word of judgment about life, i.e. if life is good or bad. Instead she sees that the author’s main concern is related to the here and now concept and the opportunities the present offers to humans.

In chapter 5 Bundvad disseminates the connection that Qohelet makes between the concepts of present (developed in chapter 4) and past and future. The main idea enclosed in this chapter is that the author of Ecclesiastes understood that the present needs to be examined in juxtaposition with the past and the future. The author examines the conclusions that Qohelet makes about the past and the future compared to present experience.

Chapter 6, the closing chapter, focuses on the narrative aspect of the book of Ecclesiastes and the role of storyteller that Qohelet takes throughout the book. Bundvad also presents a broader explanation regarding authorship concerns on the book of Ecclesiastes. She also analyzes the first-person and third-person discourses comprised in the book of Ecclesiastes.

Summarizing, this book offers a deeper perspective on the subject of time in the book of Ecclesiastes, as this concept is the cornerstone for the study of the whole book. This book is recommendable for pastors who are or will be preaching or teaching on the book of Ecclesiastes as sooner or later the theme of time needs to be addressed in order to understand the book of Ecclesiastes.

You can buy this book here

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

BibleWorks 10 part III

I am currently reading a book that guides readers through the process of integrating exegesis and exposition. That is not an easy task, and any source of help is always welcome. Of course you can preach a sermon without doing the exegesis of the passage first, but that is not going to be an outstanding sermon. Every preacher, bible professor, and teacher needs to know in depth the passage he is preaching or teaching. That requires doing a thorough exegesis of the text. The student needs to discover verbs, adjectives, nouns, pronouns, articles, and so on, in order to know quiet well the text. It takes time, of course, but the reward you and your audience get back is priceless.bibleworks-sentence-diagramBibleWorks 10 makes pastors and Bible students’ lives easier in doing exegesis. One of the most useful practices in the process of study a Bible passage I have learned at seminary was breaking the verse into small pieces. The vertical diagram technique is the best tool for doing so, and it simply powerful. It helps me to break the passage into pieces and dig into details. This technique is almost the fifty percent of my sermon. When I am done with it, I am ready to identify main points and sub points of the outline.  I am glad BibleWorks 10 does it for me because that saves me time. Diagrams are only displayed from the Greek text, though you can load many other versions to be displayed on the text window located on top the diagram window.UntitledThis feature can be confusing to users if they are not used to work with diagrams, but the good news is that BibleWorks 10 provides a column (left of the picture) that shows the meanings of every symbol. That is not all; there is a tutorial that shows users how to diagram. If you have not had the opportunity to learn to do diagrams, now it is your chance.

If you still do not know what to ask to Santa, this is the perfect Christmas present for you. You can buy it here. You will not regret.

More reviews of BibleWorks 10: Part IPart II

I received this software for free from the editors in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

What the New Testament Authors Really Cared About: A Survey of Their Writings

descargaBerding, Kenneth, and Williams, Matt, ed. What the New Testament Authors Really Cared About: A Survey of Their Writings. 2nd ed.  Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 2015.

There are many introductory books to the New Testament in the market and many more are being published and reedited. That is the case of the book What the New Testament Authors Really Cared About: A Survey of Their Writings (2nd ed).

This book could be cataloged as an introduction to the New Testament because that is the purpose of this book. The book is structured and divided by biblical authors and the books they wrote. Its main focus is to provide readers with a better understanding about the main purpose that moved every New Testament writer to write the book or letter they wrote.

Every chapter opens by answering the questions Who? When? Where? and Why? These are the basic questions that every Bible student should seek to answer in order to be able to understand the basic of every book. Then the authors include carefully crafted verses from the book under study. The authors do not engage in theological, exegetical discussions, or textual issues. Instead they provide an overview of the context of each book and the author’s main purpose.

The book includes an introductory chapter entitled “Walking in the Sands of a First-Century Jew.” This chapter summarizes the Assyrian and the Babylonian exiles, the Persian and Greek periods, and how these events affected the nation of Israel. It also covers the transition from intertestamental times to the Roman Empire as the New Testament authors knew it. The chapter provides a solid base for the study of the following chapters.

A noteworthy characteristic from this book is the maps, charts, graphics, tables, and pictures it includes. That is a very helpful aid for students who are in the process of getting familiar to the New Testament, its times and custom. The hardcover and format make this book resistant to manipulation without the inconvenient of heaviness.

In summary, its structure and content make this book an excellent resource for seminary students, pastors, Bible students, and Christians in general. If you are planning to teach introduction to the New Testament in your church or to a group of students who have never study the New Testament before, this could be one of the most helpful books you can use for that purpose. Highly recommended.

I encourage every Christian from the English speaking world to buy this book. You can buy it here

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

 

Embrace Life Under the Sun: God’s Wisdom for Today From Ecclesiastes

270694Embrace Life Under the Sun: God’s Wisdom for Today From Ecclesiastes. Greenville, SC: JourneyForth Academic, 2015. 

The book I am presenting today is a multipurpose book that was released in September 2015 by JourneyForth Academic. This is not an exegetical-technical commentary, though it includes Hebrew terms conveniently explained by Jaeggli. The way it is written allows readers to use the book as a Bible study, commentary, or even as a devotional book. However, the most useful way readers can use this book is in group setting. If you are conducting a group in your church or homes, this is the perfect book for that purpose. In addition to the book, the publisher offers six study guides for each chapter plus a leader’s guide. The guides are available in PDF format andt there are two audio resources.

The author divides the book into six chapters. He does not go verse by verse. Instead he develops six topics or ideas in each one of the chapters and deepens on the most prominent verses. Jaeggli writes in a very accessible way. That means this book is not only addressed to pastors, but also to every Christian who wants to gain knowledge about the book of Ecclesiastes.

Jaeggli advocates for Salomonic authorship, but he also expends time to presents objections to Salomonic authorship. He considers Salomonic authorship as crucial to the interpretation of the book of Ecclesiastes. Authorship issues are addressed in chapter one, which serve as an introductory chapter.

In addition to the way Jaeggli writes and explains verses, I also liked from this book the explanatory and comparative tables it includes. Sometimes tables are confusing and bothering to readers instead of being clarifying. That is not the case with this book. The few tables it includes are helpful and explanatory to the issue they discuss.

I would like to conclude by recommending this book to pastors, local church leaders, instructors, and every Christian seeking for an accessible and introductory book on Ecclesiastes.

You can buy the book and access to the additional resources here

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Bible Works 10 II

Last week I posted the first review about the software BibleWorks 10. It was an introductory entry showing the two main windows this amazing software presents. Today, I would like to dig out into the analysis window and the features and resources it offers for sermon preparation, Bible study, and exegesis.

One of the most noticeable resources you can find on the analysis window is the “Resources” tab. This tab is at the same time divided into five different tabs: Summary, Lexicons, Grammars, References, and Options. The main tab among these five tabs is the Summary tab (see picture 1). This tab shows all the lexicons, grammars, and references available for the passage you are studying. You can select or deselect resources from the other tabs (see pictures 2, 3, and 4). In other words, the summary tab shows the resources you have chosen to see among lexicons, grammars, and references. Some of the lexicons this tab offers are Friberg Analytical Lexicon, Moulton-Milligan Vocabulary of the Greek New Testament, or the Louw-Nida Greek-English Lexicon. Grammars are available in both Hebrew and Greek languages and include Burton Moods and Tenses of New Testament Greek, Robertson Grammar of the New Testament Greek, and Bible Works Greek Paradigms, just to mention few.

The summary tab also offers the option of expanding the resources it shows by opening a secondary window. You just need to click on top of the resource and it will expand to facilitate reading and deepening into it.

I can certainly say pastors and Bible students will spend most of their time on this tab since it contains the most useful resources for sermon preparation and Bible study.

I would like to highlight that all the lexicons, grammars, and other resources this tab contains are expensive resources whose starting price is close to $50 each one. Considering that this single tab contains fifty different resources, how much it would cost you to buy them separately as physical books? Exactly: $2,500. Compare to $389.00 this software would cost you. That says it all.

If you wife is having a headache trying to find the perfect Christmas present for your, here it is. Or if you would like to buy BibleWorks 10 by yourself, you can buy it here

More reviews of BibleWorks 10: Part I; Part III

Analysis Window

Image 1 Showing summary tab

resources 2

Image 2 showing references

resources 1

Image 3 showing grammars

resources

Image 4 showing lexicons

 

I received this software for free from the editors in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Tough Questions About God and His Actions in the Old Testament

9780825443763Kaiser, Walter Jr., Tough Questions About God and His Actions in the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 2015.

The Old Testament if for most of us the most difficult part of the Bible to understand. Many Christians believe that the God that is portrayed in the Old Testament has nothing to do with the God we find in the New Testament. There are many difficult questions in the Old Testament that for many Christians are difficult to answer. That is why we need books like Kaiser’.

Kaiser explores passages that have been historically unclear or difficult to understand for scholars and Christians in general. He approaches to every passage and topic in a very thorough manner and from a professional perspective. He confronts ambiguities and provides biblical answers for every one of them. For example: grace vs law, polygamy vs monogamy, or evolution vs creation, are some of the ambiguous questions about the Old Testament that Kaiser explores in this book. He appeals to passages that seems to contradict to each other, or passages that present God, in the first instance, in an opposite way.

The way Kaiser writes combines two difficult elements that not every writer is able to combine: erudition and clarity. That guarantees readers the access to a book that can be read without the need of being familiar about exegetical terms or technical words. The way Kaiser explores these topics will not let the reader to remain unclear about the questions Kaiser covers in his book. It does not mean the author tries to impose his point of view or to bias readers’ opinions. On the contrary Kaiser presents multiple perspectives for every topic and ways to biblically reconcile apparent contradictions.

The book is worthy of the price, especially is we take the quality of the writing into account.

You can buy the book here

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

The Last Days According to Jesus: When Did Jesus Say He Would Return?

Sproul, R. C., The Last Days According to Jesus: When Did Jesus Say He Would Return? Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2015.

One of the most 9780801018589controversial topics among scholars and Christians in general is the day of the second coming of the Lord. There are many questions regarding this topic and one needs to go deep into the Bible in order to obtain some clues and provide conclusions for the many questions this topic arises. It is alarming the amount of writers who go beyond the Bible and present clear speculations and final answers to these questions.

This is not the case with this book. Sproul, a renowned Reformed expositor, does not engage in personal speculations in order to feed personal anxieties regarding the second coming of the Lord. Instead, he provides a very thorough study of biblical passages that are related to this topic. He explores the description that the Bible provides for events and characters related to the end of the days. The discourse on Mount Olivet, the figure of the Antichrist, the book of Revelation, and many other topics are covered by Sproul in this book.

The book is written in a professional and scholar fashion. The author crumbles the passages and presents biblical answers for all the questions that every passage arises. He barely presents his own arguments or points of view, which would result in biased readers.

If you are a serious student looking for a book on the topic of eschatology, then this book is for you. If you are looking for a book that engages in clear identifications of eschatological figures or events, then you will most likely have a very hard time navigating through this book.

This book is worthy of the price; very accessible.

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

You can buy the book here http://bakerpublishinggroup.com/books/the-last-days-according-to-jesus-repackaged-edition/221973

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