Tag Archives: Kregel Academic

Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature: An Exegetical Book, by Richard A. Taylor and David M. Howard Jr.

descarga-1Apocalyptic literature requires a special consideration from interpreters and Bible students. There are some special steps that must be taken in interpreting apocalyptic literature in order to be successful in our interpretation and exposition.

The book Interpreting Apocalyptic Literature: An Exegetical Book, by Richard A. Taylor and David M. Howard Jr. (Kregel, 2016) is one of the most recently released books on the subject of apocalyptic literature. This volume is part of the Handbooks for Old Testament Exegesis, a series published by Kregel Academic. The authors present a very well-developed and structured text. They include the basic and beyond for readers to obtain the tools to interpret apocalyptic literature.

The book is composed by six chapters. Chapter 1 answers the logical and foundational question: What is Apocalyptic Literature? The information provided by the authors in answering this question is sufficient and clear enough. Even readers who are not familiar with apocalyptic literature could understand what they are sharing in this introductory chapter.

In chapter 2 the authors present major themes in apocalyptic literature. They consider representative texts (Daniel, Old Testament Prophets, among others) as an example of apocalyptic literature, and provide a brief overview of these texts. The also cover themes deriving from apocalyptic literature.

Chapter 3 prepares the road for interpretative aspects (Preparing for Interpretation of Apocalyptic Literature). The authors not only cover textual issues as figurative language, or issues of text. They also provide a section where they provide tools to work with original languages such as bible study software, lexical resources, and grammatical resources.

Chapter 4 deals with interpretation. Taylor and Howard provide guidelines for interpretation where they cover foundational aspect students need to consider in the study of apocalyptic literature. They also cover some pitfalls students need to identify and avoid in interpreting this style of literature.

Chapter 5 is devoted to proclaiming apocalyptic literature. This chapter is of great value as preaching apocalyptic literature requires special considerations. An exegetical outline as well as a homiletical outline of Daniel 7 is provided, so students can have an illustration of what is being said. Pastors and preacher will find this chapter very useful for their ministries.

In chapter 6, the authors present sample texts from apocalyptic literature. Both an exegetical and a homiletical outline of Daniel chapter 8 are provided in this closing chapter. In addition to that, a section called Lessons from Locust (Joel 2:28-32) is also included in this chapter. These two examples are illustrations of how to do an exegetical study of text from apocalyptical literature and what needs to be done to move form exegesis toward the exposition of the text.

I found this text to be very valuable for pastors, preachers and bible students in general. The authors write in a very accessible and concise way, providing a 200 pages book full of indispensable information for serious Bible students.

You can buy this book here from publisher or here from Amazon

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

A Syntax Guide for Readers of the Greek New Testament, by Charles Lee Irons

descargaThe study of the New Testament Greek has become an accessible area of study for both pastors and seminary students. There are multitude of NT Greek literature in the market, and many more to come. The book A Syntax Guide for Readers of the Greek New Testament written by Charles Lee Irons (Kregel, 2016) is one of the most recently released books for the study of the NT Greek. This volume has the purpose of helping NT Greek readers to have a better understanding of terms and clauses found in the NT Greek Text.

The author has produced a syntax guide that goes verse by verse covering the whole NT, though he does not follow a word by word method. The explanation for that can be found in the preface of the book. There, Irons states his main purpose in writing this guide was to provide readers with a syntax guide that can help them to read the NT Greek in a fluent manner. It can be said he accomplished his purpose. NT Greek readers can use this syntax guide without fearing to be interrupted when consulting this syntax guide.

Irons follows the critical editions of the Greek New Testament 27th and 28th Editions of the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, though he uses other textual variants. The most used English translations are the NASB, ESV, and the NIV.

Who can benefit from this syntax guide? Pastors, beginners or advanced students of NT Greek, and anyone interested in reading the NT Greek. This can be your perfect companion if you are part of any of the group aforementioned.

Buy it from Kregel or buy it from Amazon

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader, by Karen H. Jobes

descargaAnyone familiar with the study of koine Greek knows that it is a lifelong discipline. Seminaries offer different levels of study of koine Greek. Opportunely, the literature addressing the study of Greek is abundant and clearly classified by levels from introductory to advance grammars and handbooks. The book Discovering the Septuagint: A Guided Reader (Kregel) is addressed to students advance students. The purpose of this book and the public this book is addressed to is announced by the author. Jobes (2016) stated, “It is intended to aid students who have had at least three semesters of koine Greek begin to read the Greek Jewish Scriptures as found in the Rahlfs-Hanhart critical edition of the Septuagint” (Jobes, 2016, p. 9).

The author and the contributors have included over six hundred verses extracted from the Septuagint, concretely from nine different books. Each book used in this book is preceded by a brief introduction addressing critical issues in translating the book from Hebrew into Greek, as well as historical aspects.

The Greek text is presented in chapters and verses as we have in our Bibles. The verses are accompanied by grammatical and syntactical notes (not to be confused with commentaries). The purpose of the notes is to help the student to better understand the use of verbs, tense, and the use of words in general. Jobes does a great job in inserting her own voice when necessary and using appropriate terminology without falling in elongated notes. It helps readers to read the text more fluently and without getting stuck between the Greek text and the author’s notes.

Though the target audience of this book is very specific, I believe pastors familiar with Greek can benefit from this book in many aspects. Of course, this book is highly recommended to seminary students currently studying Greek. This book can be considered as a companion textbook that will give them so much light to deepen their knowledge of Greek.

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

Eschatology: Biblical, Historical, and Practical Approaches

51qI7WsVXFL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Eschatology is one of the most debated themes among evangelicals. The expectation of the last things has always called the attention of scholars. Eschatology is interpreted depending on the school of interpretation one holds. One of the most prominent seminaries on the topic of eschatology is Dallas Theological Seminary, a reputable seminary where dispensationalism is still the predominant point of view regarding eschatology. Many books on the topic of the last things have been written by professors from DTS. That is the case of the book that is being reviewed here.

Eschatology: Biblical, Historical, and Practical Approaches (D. Jeffrey Bingham & Glenn R. Kreider, ed., 2016) is a compilation of twenty-eight essays written by different authors and published by Kregel Academic. Contributors are well known scholars among evangelicals. Charles C. Ryrie, Stanley Toussaint, David L. Turner are some of the contributors readers will find inside this fine volume.

 Many people do not like books written from different authors arguing it is difficult to find a single idea or point of view. That is true to some extent. However, reading a book written by different authors developing the same idea is extremely profitable and has many advantages. One of the advantages this multiple-authors book encloses is precisely the different lenses available for readers to look at the same topic, though most of the authors subscribe to the dispensational school. That is not a handicap at all as this book will reinforce anyone’s knowledge regarding eschatology despite the school of interpretations one holds.

This work is divided into four main parts. Part 1 is devoted to The Doctrine of the Future and Its Foundations; Part 2 deals with The Doctrine of the Future in the Bible; Part 3 focuses on The Doctrine of the Future in the History of Christian Thought; and last but not least Part 4 presents The Doctrine of the Future and Christian Ministry. Eschatological discussions and topics included in this book are various.

Pastors, Bible students, and Christian in general could benefit from this book as a great source of information regarding the doctrine of the last things. One may agree or disagree with the points presented by the authors, but that does not detract quality to the book. I highly recommend this book to anyone seeking to reinforce or even lay the foundations for the study of the topic of eschatology.

I received a copy of this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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